Readings To Consider vs. The Occasional Perspective - 7/12/21

Books and Articles worth a Review… 

Alexa for Autos – Start your read with a little humor. It makes all the difficulties we are facing seem more manageable. 

The Technology of Good & Evil – The Harvard Gazette recently ran an article where it interviewed experts from various fields on how to improve the value of the internet. The article discusses the need for shifting from a culture of tech opportunism to a culture of tech in the public interest. The pandemic has brought this to the forefront. I recommend a review… 

Balance Among The Joint Chiefs – In case you had not seen the testimony of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley, as he responded with resolution and passion to questions put forward by Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla. – you need to check it out! Gaetz attempted to shift the testimony to issues related to the use of critical race theory in the U.S. military. In back to back comments, Gen. Milley said, “I've read Mao Zedong. I've read Karl Marx. I've read Lenin. That doesn't make me a communist. So what is wrong with understanding — having some situational understanding about the country for which we are here to defend?" He then continued with the observation: "And I personally find it offensive that we are accusing the United States military, our general officers, our commissioned, noncommissioned officers of being, quote, 'woke' or something else, because we're studying some theories that are out there." It was at this point that the C-SPAN cameras caught Gaetz shaking his head in a negative fashion while the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs continued his response. It shows that the military – from my perspective – is working diligently to maintain a spirit among the soldiers of defense for the entire nation – not just some of the nation. Kudos and more kudos to people like Gen. Milley! 

Back To Health Care – The research team of Scheinker, Richman, Milstein and Schulman recently published an article in Health Services Research that focused on the continuing escalation of administrative overhead costs in care delivery – Why? Where? and How? Those of us from the industry are acutely aware of the fact that escalation of administrative costs seems to be the norm. It evolves from multiple different approaches towards contracting by multiple different payors. The result is a complex network of contractual arrangements between physicians and payors. Longer story short – the groups’ simulations showed a reduction of 33 – 53% through the adoption of more simplified contracting. With the current administrative costs at about 1/3 of the total health care spend, the US is looking at spending just over $1 “T”rillion dollars on the administrative side. A 33 – 53% savings would mean an extra $330 “b”illion to one-half a “T”rillion dollars in savings that could be reallocated to “health care”. It’s clear we need to make a shift. The question is in which direction…

Healthcare Consultants

    ...Inspiring creative change to benefit the human condition